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Google urges politicians to not waste ad spend on TV

By   /  August 21, 2015  /  No Comments

In today’s news: Google wants political ad dollars, begging won’t stop ad blockers and more…

Google, digital firm warn against waste of political broadcast ads

According to a study done by Google and Targeted Victory, politicians wasted a ton of money (now, there’s something unheard of) on political ads that didn’t get seen by the voters they were targeted at. Due to the fact that broadcast markets and congressional districts basically never line up, it is believed that 75 percent of the $320 million spent on congressional elections was used to woo the wrong voters.

No doubt, Google would love to have politicians spend their money somewhere else, say, on a major search engine, but they do have a point. With more people getting their news online and the availability of geotargeted advertising, I have no idea why politicians cling to TV ads.


Google Confirms Three Mobile Text Ads Showing On Some Queries

According to Google, when someone searches for something on a mobile device, three ads instead of the regular two may show up. It’s (probably) not going to be common; they say it depends on what people are searching for and if there are several very relevant ads.

However, in spite of the fact that there is sometimes an increase in the number of ads people see, nearly the same amount of real estate is used. It appears that Google pars down ads and extensions when three are shown.

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Twitter Expands Ad Network, Brings Video Ads To Outside Apps

Since Twitter is struggling to increase its user base, the social media site is looking to grow its reach in other ways. The latest move is to allow more advertisers to use the Audience Platform, previously called the Publisher Network. Twitter users with an account manager will be able to advertise on the extended network, potentially reaching 700 million mobile users compared to just 300 million Twitter users.

Advertisers will also have a new range of ad options to choose from, including promoted Tweets, videos, interstitials and native ads.

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Amazon.com will stop accepting Flash ads on September 1

I’d call it a death by a thousand cuts if I ever though Flash was going to die. The latest move by Amazon, to completely nix all Flash based ads throughout their entire network, is a result of Firefox and Chrome making moves to disable Flash and/or Flash ads.


Advertisers Only Want to Buy Viewable Mobile Ads, But Sellers Are Waiting For Standards

With Internet traffic flowing due mobile, it’s not surprising that companies are interested in having their ads show up on mobile. However, the problem is that these companies also want people to actually see the ads they pay for. This is where a problem develops – mobile viewability tracking is still in its infancy.

The MRC has so far only issued intermediary standards for mobile viewability, and it has not yet certified anyone to be able to track it. This means that advertisers are having to go with best guesses as to what is and isn’t seen, and some ad companies are even downplaying that it is even an issue at all.


How Some Publishers Ask Readers to Stop Using Ad-Blockers: ‘Pretty Please?’

Ad blockers are a super huge issue, which is why it seems every third digital marketing article talks about them. Flummoxed by watching revenue drain away, some publishers have been reduced to begging. Wired and The Guardian have both begun displaying images where ads would normally go asking people to please turn off their ad blockers, add their site as an exception or just flat out give them money.

However, according to PageFair, the results of these entreaties is less than heartening. Only .33% of those who saw a request to turn off ad blockers or ad an exception did, and a third of those eventually undid the changes.

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I have to wonder if it might not literally kill someone at Google to post an “update” without taking features away from advertisers. As a result of Google discovering that people get higher CTRs with automated extensions compared to promotional text, promotional text is being taken away as of September 2015.

In the mean time, you can start using merchant promotions, store ratings and Trusted Stores Certifications or just throw your hands up at the futility of everything.

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About the author

I'm an avid reader of stuff and devour information of all kind. For the past four years, I've been pursuing my passion for writing. When I'm not reading or writing, you'll find me knitting. Follow me on twitter: @MarilynMaupinTS

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